NYC Marathon Check-In: Part 2

Last week, we featured just a few of our Harlem Run regulars and checked in with them and their marathon training. This week we've gotten an update from some other runners. Read their stories and be sure to drop some words of encouragement in the comments for them!

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Raydime

I can't believe the NYC Marathon is less than a month away. I am so nervous and excited for the day to come. I always enjoyed running in the heat but this summer I learned that training under the sun is no joke. I fit my training plan in with MNR and Speedwork and found some running buddies along the way: Sara, April, Talisa, Jonathan, and Larry. I also got to reconnect with an old high school friend who reached out to me! Training helped me rediscover yoga - Saturday sessions in Central Park led by Pineapple Yogi. My long time friend, the ice bath, also made a much needed comeback. Talisa's HIIT workouts kicked my butt so I can hit the pavement better and stronger. Last but not least foam roller is definitely BAE!

The hardest time for me to stay motivated was September. My knees started acting up and I was all over the place emotionally. I recently moved to the Bronx, which was outside of my comfort zone and home (Harlem) and I had never really ran there before. A depressive episode was triggered by personal setbacks but luckily I found support in my Harlem Run famalam. I was invited for a long run with some amazing people where I pushed through 20 miles - my longest run EVER. My confidence was wavering but it was nurtured and eventually restored. To be honest, I didn't think I could run a marathon until that run where I found bits and pieces of inspiration to keep me going. Every run, good or bad, taught me something new and I am anxious to see how it all comes together on November 6th. 

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Terria

I started marathon training in July and this has been a LOOONNGGG 16+ weeks!! The early weeks were easy but as I got into the lengthy runs and multiple long runs per week, I eventually reached a point of mental and physical fatigue. So much training in the books and still so many weeks to go, straight dreading how much training remained.... It really took a lot to push through those thoughts. But I've had a flame under me to run this race since cheering at last year's NYC Marathon! The drive to succeed and reach my goal really got me through training, and it helps to have so many Harlem Run friends to train with and trade stories with. Now, here we are, I cannot believe I am just weeks away from my first NYC Marathon run!

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Alison

At a recent #HarlemRunTalks, a Harlem Run member's mind was blown when she realized that it was possible to run/walk a marathon.  "I thought it was mandatory you run the entire way and that's why I never planned on signing up for one," she said.  It was exciting to see her eyes light up when she realized that she too can be a marathoner one day. Marathons are not only for the fast or the elite, they are for anyone who is committed to the challenge.

I'm excited to see all of run/walkers and walkers at this year's NYC Marathon, particularly since I will be among them.  That's right - you heard me - I'll be run/walking my 4th marathon. This is new ground for me, because, in past years, my major concern has always been about how the numbers on the clock would define my experience.  I look forward to who I'll meet along the way and the opportunity to extend a warm welcome for them to join the movement on Monday and Thursday nights. As the only run crew to have a walking group and run/walking group just know- there is a pace group for you!

Talisa

Marathon training is going well despite it being very time-consuming and exhausting. I really do appreciate my Saturday 5am long run group because we hold each other accountable, we get in our scheduled mileage for the day, no one is left behind, and our runs take us to different parts of the city we often don't get a chance to explore.